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10 May 2019

The Horrifying Buruli Ulcer

Buruli ulcer cases across the state of Victoria, Australia, have rapidly increased, leaving researchers stumped. More than 380 cases of the ulcer were reported last year, with the majority of cases linked to the Mornington Peninsula, south of Melbourne’s CBD. Symptoms of the condition are confronting, with the ulcer ‘eating’ human flesh and leaving the infected person with a gaping skin lesion. The Buruli ulcer can lead to permanent disfigurement if untreated.

What is the Buruli Ulcer?
Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The initial trauma can be a mild skin wound such as scratch. The early stage of the infection is characterised by a painless nodule or area of swelling. This nodule can turn into an ulcer. The ulcer may be larger inside than at the surface of the skin, and can be surrounded by swelling. As the disease worsens, bone can be infected. Buruli ulcers most commonly affect the arms or legs; fever is uncommon. Mycobacterium ulcerans releases a toxin known as mycolactone, which decreases immune system function and results in tissue death. Bacteria from the same group also cause tuberculosis and leprosy.  How the disease is spread is not known. Sources of water may be involved in the spread, but no specific activities that bring people into contact with water have been identified (i.e. fetching of water, fishing, rice farming, washing, bathing, etc.). The mode of transmission of Buruli ulcer is not entirely known. As of 2019 there is no effective vaccine.

The infection occurs in well-defined areas throughout the world, mostly tropical areas — in several areas in Australia, in Uganda, in several countries in West Africa, in Central and South America, in southeast Asia and New Guinea. It is steadily rising as a serious disease, especially in West Africa and underdeveloped countries, where it is the third leading cause of mycobacterial infection in healthy people, after tuberculosis and leprosy. The disease is more likely to occur where there have been environmental changes such as the development of water storages, sand mining, and irrigation. 

The disease also occurs in animals other than humans, though no link between animal and human infection has been established

In Australia it is also known as Bairnsdale ulcer or Daintree ulcer. Other names include Searls ulcer,  Kumusi ulcer, and mycoburuli ulcers.

Treatment for Buruli Ulcer
There is no specific vaccine for Myocobacterium ulcerans. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine may offer temporary protection.

Tips for stopping the Buruli ulcer :-
  • Avoid insect bites by using suitable insect repellents and long clothing, especially during the warmer months or high mosquito activity;
  • Protect cuts or abrasions with sticking plasters;
  • Promptly wash and cover any scratches or cuts received while working outdoors;
  • Seeing your doctor if you have a persistent skin lesion and mention the possibility of Buruli ulcer.
A Psychic's  view of Buruli ulcer
When I tune into this, I see the "Poison" symbol. I get this is caused by some kind of toxic "dumping" that breeches into water sources and creates mutated bacteria that is resistant to most methods of treatment. (Find what is disposed where, and cross reference this to determine the true source). This bacteria is ingested either directly via the water or indirectly by food sources that are contaminated by the water. 

When I look at how to rid yourself of the bacteria (I need to disclose that I am not a doctor, this is what I see intuitively) I get a fast (the amount of time varies with your weight and should be done under medical supervision). A fast helps to starve the bacteria, kill it and strengthen your healthy cells. Throughout the fasting process you digestive system can pull it resources and aid your immune system to help it work in overdrive riding you of the toxic bacteria.

Comment
"My mother-in-law just had one of these, the doctors were useless, she was at the hospital every few day but they couldn't decide what caused it, they put her on all kinds of antibiotics but nothing helped, it even went gangrene, she almost lost her leg until we started her on 'colloidal silver', doctors were shocked because it fixed her leg within a week, this was over five months with the hospital treatment" - Fiona, Facebook

NOTE Images for this ulcer were considered too graphic to share.

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